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Sermon Passages: Colossians 3:20; Proverbs 29:17

Like instruction, disciplining your children—admonishing or calling them to soundness of mind and self-control—changes as your child grows. Whatever their age, however, the goal of discipline is ultimately the godliness and welfare of your child. We discipline our children out of love and affection, not hatred or anger. Proverbs 29:15 says, “The rod and reproof give wisdom, but a child left to himself brings shame to his mother.” Mickey gives excellent instruction about what this does and does not mean.


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Sermon Passages: Deuteronomy 5:32-6:9; Ephesians 6:1-4; Colossians 3:20-21

The first session of our fall parenting seminar looked at the duty of parents and our dependence on God's grace; his commands in the Old and New Testaments call fathers and mothers to a high standard in bringing up the children He has given them.


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Sermon Passages: Colossians 1:3-8

Regardless of the things of this world, faith deepens, love increases, hope abounds, and the Gospel advances. That is the power of the Gospel and proof that the Gospel is all we need. Thank you, Mark Prater, for an encouraging reminder of the Gospel growth that happens as we love God, love one another, and love our neighbors.

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Sermon Passages: Colossians 4:3-6; 1 Peter 3:15; Matthew 5:13-16

Evaluating Your Personal Style of Evangelism—Have you ever thought: If only I were smarter or a better speaker or more outgoing, then I'd be more effective in evangelism? There are many "styles" of evangelism. Really. And one of them is surely yours. God has gifted us all for evangelism. This week's discipleship class looks at the characteristics, encouragements, and cautions of six styles of evangelism. Perhaps you'll discover yours!


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Sermon Passages: Titus 2:11; Colossians 3:5; Philippians 2:13; Ephesians 5:18

Sanctification is progressively being made like Christ. It is a work of grace, but one which the believe cooperates with, unlike salvation which is purely the work of God, faith and repentance being merely our response to that work. Justification is instantaneous and complete; sanctification is progressive and incomplete until we are glorified in heaven. Justification means the end of the unconquerable dominion of sin; sanctification is the gradual growth in the power and desire to obey. Biblically, our greatest enemy is sin, the flesh; it is not the devil and our circumstances, though these can introduce temptations to us. Sanctification is a work of man and requires us to renounce sin (Tit 2:11f), mortify sin (Col 3:5), and cannot be done casually. Thus, we need to recognize that because of the power of sin, even things that are biblically allowable might be for us unhelpful and lead to further temptations. These we need to remove from our lives. This fight also must be specific. Sanctification is also a work of God and requires the Holy Spirit (Phil 2:13). We are dependent upon him to understand and love God's word, to walk in obedience, and thus we need to pray regularly to be filled with the Spirit (Eph 5:18).